Nature Study Books

The Story of Earth

by Robert M. Hazen

A delightful read, telling the story of the first 4.5 billion years of the history of planet Earth, “from stardust to living planet.”

 

 

What the Robin Knows

what-the-robin-knows.jpg

by Jon Young.

A delightful read on how to observe and interpret the language and behaviors of birds and other wild critters.

 

 

The Usborne Complete First Book of Nature

(1990) Usborne Publishing.

If you can get this old book, it is well worth it for the very little ones.  A simple-to-read, very heavily illustrated, first field guide to nature.

 

 

One Well: the Story of Water on Earth

by Rochelle Strauss.

An illustrated overview of Earth’s hydrosphere and its water cycles.

 

 

 

Tree of Life: the Incredible Biodiversity of Life on Earth

by Rochelle Strauss.

An illustrated overview of the modern system of classification of all living things, from Kingdoms down to Species.

 

 

Firefly Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs and Prehistoric Animals

by Dr. Douglas Palmer.

Heavily illustrated, with short bursts of text.  Great for young readers.  Covers early geological time, and artist-illustrations of what ancient animal life may have looked like, based upon fossil remains.

 

 

Firefly Encyclopedia of Animals

by Camilla de la Bédoyere and Dr. Philip Whitfield.

Heavily illustrated, with short bursts of text.  Great for young readers.  Covers a wide sampling of modern-day animal life from around the world.

 

 

A Small Home Library of Local Field-Guides & Reference Books

No Quercus Academy scholar should be without a series of illustrated field-guides and reference books describing the flora, fauna, and geological and climatic phenomena of their geographical region.  Such books serve as both inspirations for exploration, and references for observation.  For those of us living in the Coast Range mountains of California, near the San Francisco Bay, useful field-guides and references include: